The Charles Joyner Institute for Gullah and African Diaspora Studies, Conway: Route to (re)settlement Exhibition Venue & Academic Partner

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About

The Charles Joyner Institute for Gullah and African Diaspora Studies examines the historical migration and scattering of African populations to local geographical areas and the subsequent evolution of blended cultures, specifically Gullah. CCU’s location at the northern tip of the Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor puts it in a unique position for diaspora study and research. The work of the institute provides students with experiential learning opportunities, both at home and abroad, that center on interconnections among local, national and global peoples and their societies. 

The Charles Joyner Institute is comprised of experiential learning projects, special events, and a minor in African Diaspora Studies.

In March 2019, the Joyner Institute will host the first annual conference on Gullah Geechee and African Diaspora Studies

 

International Gullah Geechee and African Diaspora Conference

Tracing the African Diaspora: Places of Suffering, Resilience and Reinvention March 7-9, 2019 | Coastal Carolina University Conway, SC

The Charles W. Joyner Institute for Gullah and African Diaspora Studies at Coastal Carolina University, Conway, South Carolina, invites abstracts and panel proposals for its 1st Annual International Gullah Geechee and African Diaspora (IGGAD) Conference. This year’s theme—Tracing the African Diaspora: Places of Suffering, Resilience and Reinvention—examines significant social, political and cultural experiences among African American communities and various African and Caribbean nations in the past, present and envisioned future. Papers that contribute new knowledge and understanding in the broad areas of racial identity, feminism, transnational migration, gender studies, public health, religion, slavery, Afrofuturism, Pan-Africanism and Gullah/Geechee are encouraged. Such discourses will expand our understanding of the uniqueness of the African Diaspora and the commonalities that bind societies within this global phenomenon together.

The IGGAD conference will bring together academics and practitioners from interdisciplinary areas of study, who offer their ground-breaking contributions in the form of scholarly papers, films, performances and spoken poetry. Our keynote speaker is Dr. Sheila S. Walker, cultural anthropologist and filmmaker, and there are exciting performances planned by singers Ron and Natalie Daise, The Geechee Gullah Ring Shouters, Step Afrika and Charleston, South Carolina’s poet laureate Marcus Amaker. Of special importance is our conference’s emphasis on the community-based participatory model, which recognizes the relevance of cultural practitioners and community participation. To this end, we anticipate critical dialogues and shared learning among scholars, artisans and community members.